30 November 2008

redsun rf1201 nighttime mediumwave tuning

In a previous post, I tested daytime FM reception on my miniscule Redsun RF1201 radio. Along with my digitally-tuned Eton E5 for reference tuning, I used the RF1201 on an evening in November for some mediumwave tuning exploration. For each signal received, I've listed the callsign, frequency, and approximate distance from my location.

AM reception

KSFO 560 khz (0 miles): Strong signal but a bit noisy.

KEAR 610 khz (0 miles): Clear signal.

KNBR 680 khz (0 miles): strong signal with the needle centered on the 700 on the AM scale.

KCBS 740 khz (0 miles): Strong signal with the needle to the right of the 700 on the AM scale.

KKOH 780 khz (200 miles): Weak signal (I missed this the first time through) with the needle to the left of the 900 on the AM scale.

KGO 810 khz (0 miles): Strong signal with the tuning needle to the left of the 900 on the AM scale.

KTRB 860 khz (0 miles): Weak signal. The needle was almost centered on the 900 on the AM scale.

KNEW 910 khz (10 miles): Strong signal with the needle right of center of the 900 on the AM scale.

KWRU 940 khz (170 miles): Weak signal (I missed this the first time through) with the needle on the right edge of the 900 on the AM scale.

KKGN 960 khz (10 miles): Strong, clear signal with the needle to the right of the 900 on the AM scale.

KFWB 980 khz (360 miles): Very weak signal (not very usable) with the tuning needle to the right of the 900 on the AM scale.

KOMO 1000 khz (750 miles): Weak, noisy signal with the needle less than halfway between 900 and 1200 on the AM scale.

KIQI 1010 khz (0 miles): Average signal with the needle less than halfway between 900 and 1200 on the AM scale.

KTCT 1050 khz (20 miles): Strong, clear signal with the needle more than halfway between 900 and 1200 on the AM scale.

??? 1090 khz: Extremely weak, and impossible to isolate from the adjacent signal on 1100. The needle was just left of the 1200 on the AM scale.

KFAX 1100 khz (0 miles): Strong, mostly clear signal with the needle over the 1 in the 1200 on the AM scale.

KHTK 1140 khz (70 miles): Average signal with the needle between the 1 and the 2 in the 1200 on the AM scale.

KLOK 1170 khz (45 miles): Weak, noisy signal with the needle almost centered on the 1200 on the AM scale.

KSFB 1260 (0 miles): Strong, clear signal with the needle on the last digit in the 1200 on the AM scale.

KMKY 1310 khz (10 miles): Loud, strong, clear signal with the needle to the right of the 1200 on the AM scale.

KZSF 1370 khz (45 miles): Weak, noisy signal with the needle centered between the 1200 and the 1620 on the AM scale.

KVTO 1400 khz (10 miles): Strong, clear signal with the needle to the left of the 1620 on the AM scale.

KEST 1450 khz (0 miles): Average, clear signal with the needle on the 1 in the 1620 on the AM scale.

KSJX 1500 khz (45 miles): Weak, noisy signal with the needle on the 6 in the 1620 on the AM scale.

KFBK 1530 khz (70 miles): Weak signal with the needle centered on the 1620 on the AM scale.

KMPC 1540 khz (360 miles): "Radio Korea... Los Angeles." Really weak signal; sounded choppy due to a stronger signal on the adjacent channel (1550).

KYCY 1550 khz (0 miles): Strong signal with the needle just right of center on the 1620 on the AM scale.

Unfortunately, 1550 was the highest signal I could get reliably, so I was unable to really test the upper bounds of the AM band on this radio.

In a few cases, this little radio picked up mediumwave broadcasts from hundreds of miles away. However, weak signals that are adjacent to stronger signals will often be unusable.

2 comments:

SETXDXER said...

Congratulations on all your logs using the RF1201! Just wondering - the RF1201 looks very similar to the Kaito WRX-911 that I have. My WRX-911 has a cobalt blue case. Here's a review of the WRX-911 ...

http://www.radiointel.com/review-kaitowrx911.htm

73,

Steve N5WBI

Nordico radioaficionado said...

Could you please find out if KIQI 1010 uses the slogan Mega 1,010?
A station with Mexican music was
heard with the slogan "Más grande que ... Mega Mil Diez" where ... indicates dos missing words.